Ejection Inspection, Week Five: Replay Angers Aaron Boone, New York Yankees

Chicago White Sox Manager Rick Renteria, San Francisco Giants Manager Bruce Bochy Also Receive Second Ejections of the Season

Aaron Boone
PHOENIX, ARIZONA - MAY 01: Manager Aaron Boone #17 of the New York Yankees argues with home plate umpire Paul Emmel #50 after being ejected during the seventh inning of a game against the Arizona Diamondbacks at Chase Field on May 01, 2019 in Phoenix, Arizona. (Photo by Norm Hall/Getty Images)

Welcome to Week Five of Ejection Inspection! This week saw New York Yankees manager Aaron Boone get ejected for the second straight week over replay (indirectly this time). The premise and ground rules of the column are detailed here. The condensed version: each ejection from the previous week (Thursday through Wednesday) is listed in a table. The author – a former player/coach/umpire – analyzes each ejection and assigns it an entertainment rating of one to five Weavers in honor of late Orioles manager Earl Weaver.

(For a list of every article in this series, click here.)

There were five ejections in Week Five – one player, a pitching coach, and three managers.

Date Team Opp Inn. Name Pos Umpire Pos Reason
1 Sun 4/28 CWS DET B3 Rick Renteria Mgr Tony Randazzo HP Arguing interference call
2 Sun 4/28 TOR OAK T11 Pete Walker PtC Alfonso Marquez HP Arguing balls and strikes
3 Mon 4/29 COL @MIL T5 Ian Desmond CF Jeff Nelson HP Arguing balls and strikes
4 Wed 5/1 NYY @AZ T7 Aaron Boone Mgr Paul Emmel HP Arguing potential HBP
5 Wed 5/1 SF LAD B7 Bruce Bochy Mgr Tim Timmons HP Arguing balls and strikes

 

Rick Renteria, Chicago White Sox Manager

When

Sunday, April 28, vs. Detroit Tigers, bottom of the third

Umpire

Tony Randazzo (HP)

Description

White Sox first baseman Jose Abreu swung and missed on 0-2, but the catcher did not catch the pitch. The throw to first hit him in the back. Because Abreu was inside the foul line when the ball hit him, he was out for interference. Renteria came onto the field and argued emphatically with Randazzo. Renteria stormed from home to first while making his point, made large motions with both arms, then marched back to the plate. After a prolonged argument, Randazzo ejected him.

Understand the frustration?

No. Renteria has been in baseball for decades. He should know the rule by now. It’s straightforward and has no exceptions. During the last half of the trip between home and first, the runner must run in the 45-foot box. If the ball hits him and he’s not running in the box, he’s out.

Was the ejection justified?

Yes. Renteria had been told to end the discussion and return to the dugout, but he stayed on the field and continued to argue.

Entertainment Rating

Three Weavers. Renteria put on quite a show with his march to first, but he didn’t have to be restrained. He also didn’t kick dirt, throw his hat, or turn red.

Pete Walker, Toronto Blue Jays Pitching Coach

Sunday, April 28, vs. Oakland Athletics, top of 11th

Umpire

Alfonso Marquez (HP)

Description

After an RBI double off Blue Jays reliever Thomas Pannone gave the Athletics a 3-1 lead, Walker visited the mound. Marquez went to the mound to end the conference. Walker made some remarks to Marquez as he walked back to the dugout and Marquez walked back to the plate. Marquez said a couple of things to Walker. Walker continued to jaw at Marquez and was ejected. He then said a few more things to Marquez before leaving the field.

Understand the frustration?

The fourth ball to the leadoff hitter looked like it should have been called a strike, but three more guys batted between the walk and the ejection, so no. Pannone was not missing many bats. That’s not Marquez’s fault.

Was the ejection justified?

Tough to tell, but one would think that Marquez’s initial response to Walker was a warning due to gestures and body language. If so, then Walker should not have continued to jaw at him. Therefore, the answer is “probably.”

Entertainment Rating

One Weaver. It was over in a hurry.

Ian Desmond, Colorado Rockies Center Fielder

When

Monday, April 29, at Milwaukee Brewers, top of the fifth

Umpire

Jeff Nelson (HP)

Description

On a 2-2 count, Desmond took a fastball over the outside corner for strike three. He stayed at the plate and argued with Nelson at length. After Desmond was told to stop, Rockies manager Bud Black arrived to talk with Nelson. Desmond stayed and continued pointing at Nelson from behind Black while jawing more emphatically. Nelson then tossed him. As third base coach Stu Cole tried to pull Desmond away, Desmond grew more emphatic. Second base umpire Laz Diaz then arrived to try and break up the situation, but Desmond still continued to argue and point. When third base umpire Chris Conroy arrived, Desmond finally stopped and left the game.

Understand the frustration?

According to the on-screen strike zone, the pitch was outside, but just barely. It was close enough that calling it a strike was not far-fetched. For Desmond to be slightly frustrated is understandable, but not to the level he took it. Kids are taught since Little League to “protect the plate” and swing at “anything close.”

Was the ejection justified?

Yes. Desmond’s prolonged argument was ridiculous. Nelson gave him PLENTY of opportunities to stay in the game.

Entertainment Rating

One Weaver. Although Desmond was heated for a little bit, overall, it was annoying. Desmond kept going on and on and on and on.

Aaron Boone, New York Yankees Manager

When

Wednesday, May 1, at Arizona Diamondbacks, top of the seventh

Umpire

Paul Emmel (HP)

Description

Yankees second baseman Tyler Wade led off the top of the seventh with his team trailing, 3-1. On 0-1, he squared around to bunt. The pitch bounced near his left foot as he pulled the bat back. Emmel called “ball” as Wade turned to the dugout and signaled that the ball hit his foot. Aaron Boone could not challenge, since he had used his challenge in the fifth and, surprisingly, lost.

Boone asked Emmel to check replay. Emmel called in the other three umpires for a discussion. They decided that they were certain the ball did not hit Wade’s foot and that replay was unnecessary. Aaron Boone calmly said something before walking away and was thrown out. Boone went back out to vent his frustration. While in Emmel’s face, he grew more adamant, yelling louder and gesturing more emphatically with each word. After getting his fill, he stormed toward the visiting clubhouse. Two steps into his path, he grabbed the gum out of his mouth and hurled it onto the field.

Understand the frustration?

Yes, but it felt like he was taking out his frustration from the earlier replay challenge.

Was the ejection justified?

It felt like he said that he would not leave the field unless he was ejected, so yes.

Entertainment Rating

Boone is fun to watch when he gets angry. This ejection, capped by the angry gum toss, was just as entertaining as Renteria’s, so it also earns three Weavers.

Bruce Bochy, San Francisco Giants Manager

When

Wednesday, May 1, vs. Los Angeles Dodgers, bottom of the seventh

Umpire

Tim Timmons (HP)

Description

Giants first baseman Brandon Belt was called out on strikes (Sound familiar? See Week Four.) to lead off the bottom of the seventh. As the next hitter – catcher Buster Posey batted, the second pitch – which looked low – was called a strike instead of ball two. Someone in the Giants dugout was arguing, and Timmons looked into the dugout to tell the offender to stop. After a very brief pause, Timmons ejected Bochy.

Bochy came onto the field and asked if he was the one who was ejected. Timmons said yes. Then Bochy asked, “What (expletive) did you throw me out for?” A heated, profanity-laced argument ensued. After about a minute, Bochy left the field.

Understand the frustration?

Yes. Not only was the pitch low, but it seems like Timmons might have had a quick trigger.

Was the ejection justified?

What was originally said is unknown, so a definitive answer cannot be given.

Entertainment Rating

Two Weavers, which is high for Bochy. He was plenty mad, but he’s such a calm guy that it wasn’t as intense as Renteria and Boone.

Look for Week Six on Thursday, May 9.

Evan Thompson played baseball as a youth and teenager. He also umpired between 1995 and 2004 and has coached at the high school level.

Main Photo
Embed from Getty Images

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.