Ejection Inspection, Week 17: Part One — Aaron Boone of New York Yankees Unleashes Epic Rant

Aaron Boone
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - JULY 18: Manager Aaron Boone #17 of the New York Yankees argues with home plate umpire Brennan Miller #55 during the second inning of game one of a doubleheader against the Tampa Bay Rays at Yankee Stadium on July 18, 2019 in the Bronx borough of New York City. (Photo by Sarah Stier/Getty Images)

Aaron Boone Unleashes Epic Rant

Welcome to Week 17 of Ejection Inspection! The premise and ground rules are detailed here. The condensed version: each ejection from the previous week (Thursday through Wednesday) is listed in a table. The author – a former player/coach/umpire – analyzes each ejection and assigns it an entertainment rating of one to five Weavers in honor of late Baltimore Orioles manager Earl Weaver. This week, New York Yankees manager Aaron Boone earned Five Weavers after one of the all-time great rants.

(For a list of every article in this series, click here.)

There were 10 ejections in Week 17 – four managers and six players.

1 Thu 7/18 NYY TB B2 Aaron Boone Mgr Brennan Miller HP Arguing balls/strikes
2 Thu 7/18 CWS @KC T2 Rick Renteria Mgr Adam Hamari HP Arguing balls/strikes
3 Fri 7/19 COL @NYY T9 Bud Black Mgr Doug Eddings HP Arguing checked swing
4 Fri 7/19 CIN STL T2 Eugenio Suarez 3B Carlos Torres HP Arguing balls/strikes
5 Fri 7/19 CIN STL T2 David Bell Mgr Carlos Torres HP Arguing ejection of Suarez
6 Fri 7/19 AZ MIL B8 Ketel Marte CF Sam Holbrook HP Arguing balls/strikes
7 Sun 7/21 SF NYM T9 Kevin Pillar CF Mark Ripperger HP Arguing balls/strikes
8 Wed 7/24 CHC @SF T5 Anthony Rizzo 1B Jordan Baker HP Yelling profanity after striking out
9 Wed 7/24 COL @WSN T7 Kyle Freeland P John Libka HP Arguing balls/strikes
10 Wed 7/24 LAD LAA T9 Cody Bellinger RF Dan Iassogna HP Arguing balls/strikes

 

Aaron Boone, New York Yankees Manager

When

Thursday, July 18th, Game One of a double header vs. Tampa Bay Rays, bottom of the second

Umpire

Brennan Miller (HP)

Description

Miller had a tough start to the game. There were a few pitches by Yankees starter Domingo German that were called balls even though they were in the zone. When the Yankees batted, there were a few pitches out of the zone that were called strikes. It reached a boiling point when Yankees left fielder Brett Gardner took a tailing 1-2 fastball that was inside, only for Miller to call, “Strike three!”

Aaron Boone said something from the dugout as Gardner banged his bat against the dugout ceiling several times, inspiring this hilarious clip on Twitter. Boone yelled, “(Bleeping) get better, Brennan, let’s (bleeping) go. Bear down, let’s go! Really bad start.”

Aaron Boone Crosses the Line

Then D.J. LeMahieu took the first pitch, and it tailed around the plate again, well outside. Miller called strike one. LeMahieu, who never says anything to umpires, turned around and said something to Miller. Boone grew even more irritated and yelled even more sharply, “Bear the (expletive) down! Let’s go!” Miller retorted, “I heard you, Aaron!” Boone yelled, “That’s (bleeping) terrible!” After LeMahieu fouled the next pitch off, Boone said something else, and Miller yelled, “GET OUT, AARON!” as he gave him the thumb.

Aaron Boone Rants at Miller

Boone stormed up to Miller and let him have it. “My guys are (bleeping) savages in that (bleeping) box, alright?” Boone said as he pointed to the batter’s box. “You’re having a piece of (expletive) start to this game. I feel bad for you. But (bleeping) get better. That guy (pointing to the mound) is a good pitcher, but our guys are (bleeping) savages in that box.” As Boone turned to face Miller again, the bill of Boone’s hat hit the bill of Miller’s. (The hat collision later cost Boone a one-game suspension.) Boone continued to tell Miller twice more, with expletives, that his guys are savages. He ended with, “Tighten it up, right now,” then clapped with each word as he said, “Tighten this (expletive) up.” Boone then stormed to the clubhouse.

Understand the frustration?

Yes. Miller was not off to a good start.

Was the ejection justified?

Yes. Although Miller was having trouble, Boone still cannot argue balls and strikes for long and expect to stay in the game, especially after being warned to stop.

Entertainment Rating

Five Weavers. This was one of the all-time great rants.

 

Rick Renteria, Chicago White Sox Manager

When

Thursday, July 18th, at Kansas City Royals, top of the second

Umpire

Adam Hamari (HP)

Description

According to Renteria’s account to the Chicago Tribune, after Yolmer Sanchez opened the top of the second with a single up the middle, Renteria yelled something like “both ways” before the base hit. After the hit, the umpire pointed at the dugout and yelled a few things along the lines of “I’m not going to have it.” Renteria said that he asked him to pay attention to the field then repeated that when Hamari told him, “Don’t tell me what to do.” At that point, Hamari tossed him. Renteria ran onto the field to vent his frustrations before heading to the clubhouse. During the entire conversation, Renteria covered his mouth with his hat so no one could read his lips. (Author’s note: Has he read this column?)

Understand the frustration?

Yes, since from Renteria’s angle the zone was inconsistent.

Was the ejection justified?

From Renteria’s account, it technically was, although it seemed like a quick trigger. The ball was still in play when the yelling started, after all.

Entertainment Rating

Two Weavers. Renteria gets a bonus of One Weaver for covering his mouth with his hat.

 

Bud Black, Colorado Rockies Manager

When

Friday, July 19, at New York Yankees, top of the ninth

Umpire

Doug Eddings (HP)

Description

Catcher Chris Iannetta led off the top of the ninth with the Rockies trailing, 8-2. He checked his swing on a 3-2 pitch that was out of the zone. When he started to trot to first, Eddings ruled that he swung, prompting irate reactions from both Iannetta and Black. Black yelled an expletive that starts with “bull” several times at Eddings. Eddings warned him, but Black continued, and Eddings ran him.

Understand the frustration?

Yes. On a play like this, it is always wise to appeal to the base umpire and reduce, if not eliminate, all doubt. When plate umpires don’t do that, it is always frustrating.

Was the ejection justified?

Yes. Black received warnings to stop but didn’t.

Entertainment Rating

One Weaver. Black never came onto the field.

 

Eugenio Suarez, Cincinnati Reds Third Baseman
David Bell, Cincinnati Reds Manager

When

Friday, July 19th, vs. St. Louis Cardinals, top of the second

Umpire

Carlos Torres (HP)

Description

Suarez batted in the bottom of the first of a scoreless game with a runner on first and nobody out. The first pitch from Adam Wainwright appeared to be several inches outside, but Torres called strike one. Suarez did not react. The next pitch came in the same location, and Suarez fouled it off the end of the bat. Pitch number three was closer to the plate – but still outside – and Suarez fouled that one off as well. Wainwright then threw a pitch almost directly down the middle, and Suarez took it for strike three. He was irate, giving Torres an earful as he headed to the dugout.

As Suarez took his position at third base in the top of the second, he had to run by Torres, since the Reds dugout in Cincinnati is the first base dugout. He jawed at Torres twice as he ran by. Just before reaching third, he yelled over at Torres again and waved his arm. That was it – Torres bounced him.

Suarez ran up to Torres and got right in his face. Torres told him that he had asked him four times to stop, but Suarez continued. Manager David Bell arrived very quickly and continued the argument. He yelled several words, and Torres did not wait long before sending Bell to join Suarez in the clubhouse. This was Bell’s seventh ejection of the year – a record for first-year Reds managers, a list that includes Lou Piniella, Pete Rose, and Ray Knight.

Understand the frustration?

Yes, since three of those pitches were outside. However, Suarez’s refusal to stop – especially heading into the second inning – is baffling. Torres gave him a long leash.

Was the ejection justified?

Both were, and both were ridiculous.

Entertainment Rating

One Weaver. This was neither entertaining nor memorable.

Due to length restrictions, Part Two is here.

Evan Thompson played baseball as a youth and teenager. He also umpired between 1995 and 2004 and has coached at the high school level.

Main Photo
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