Ejection Inspection, Week 17: Part Two — Dan Iassogna Angers Cody Bellinger, Los Angeles Dodgers

Cody Bellinger
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - JULY 23: Cody Bellinger #35 of the Los Angeles Dodgers is tagged out at home by Dustin Garneau #13 of the Los Angeles Angels, to end the game for a 5-4 Angel win, during the ninth inning at Dodger Stadium on July 23, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

Dan Iassogna Angers Cody Bellinger, Los Angeles Dodgers

Welcome to Part Two of Week 17 of Ejection Inspection! Part One is here. Part Two has less fireworks than Part One, but the biggest highlight came in Los Angeles, where Los Angeles Dodgers outfielder Cody Bellinger received his first ejection of the season.

(For a list of every article in this series, click here.)

There were 10 ejections in Week 17 – four managers and six players.

1 Thu 7/18 NYY TB B2 Aaron Boone Mgr Brennan Miller HP Arguing balls/strikes
2 Thu 7/18 CWS @KC T2 Rick Renteria Mgr Adam Hamari HP Arguing balls/strikes
3 Fri 7/19 COL @NYY T9 Bud Black Mgr Doug Eddings HP Arguing checked swing
4 Fri 7/19 CIN STL T2 Eugenio Suarez 3B Carlos Torres HP Arguing balls/strikes
5 Fri 7/19 CIN STL T2 David Bell Mgr Carlos Torres HP Arguing ejection of Suarez
6 Fri 7/19 AZ MIL B8 Ketel Marte CF Sam Holbrook HP Arguing balls/strikes
7 Sun 7/21 SF NYM T9 Kevin Pillar CF Mark Ripperger HP Arguing balls/strikes
8 Wed 7/24 CHC @SF T5 Anthony Rizzo 1B Jordan Baker HP Yelling profanity after striking out
9 Wed 7/24 COL @WSN T7 Kyle Freeland P John Libka HP Arguing balls/strikes
10 Wed 7/24 LAD LAA T9 Cody Bellinger RF Dan Iassogna HP Arguing balls/strikes

 

Ketel Marte, Arizona Diamondbacks Center Fielder

When

Friday, July 19th, vs. Milwaukee Brewers, bottom of the eighth

Umpire

Sam Holbrook (HP)

Description

Marte batted in the bottom of the seventh with the bases empty, two out, and the Diamondbacks holding a 10-7 lead. The first pitch from Burch Smith, a tailing changeup, appeared to be several inches outside, but Holbrook called strike one. Marte shook his head once and continued the at-bat. The next two pitches missed, making the count 2-1. Pitch number four was another tailing changeup that appeared to be outside again, but closer than the first pitch. Holbrook called strike two, drawing several words of protest from Marte, some that came while Marte turned to face him. The count ran full, then Marte swung at a pitch down the middle. He foul tipped it into the catcher’s mitt for strike three.

Marte spiked his bat and then his helmet. Holbrook immediately gave him the heave-ho, drawing more arguments from Marte. On-deck hitter Eduardo Escobar and third base coach Tony Perezchica sprinted to Marte and guided him to the dugout. Diamondbacks manager Torey Lovullo asked what happened then returned to the dugout.

Understand the frustration?

The pitches Marte disputed were probably out of the zone, so that frustration makes sense. Arizona also felt like there was a double standard, since Ryan Braun tossed his bat and helmet toward the dugout earlier in the game after striking out. The difference, however, was the way they threw their equipment. Braun launched it toward the dugout while Marte spiked it.

Was the ejection justified?

Yes. Players cannot spike their equipment like that and expect to stay in the game.

Entertainment Rating

One Weaver. There was nothing special about this one.

 

Kevin Pillar, San Francisco Giants Center Fielder

When

Sunday, July 21st, vs. New York Mets, top of the ninth

Umpire

Mark Ripperger (HP)

Description

Ripperger’s zone angered both teams all game, but it came to a boiling point in the bottom of the eighth with two out and a runner on first. Pillar took the first pitch from Seth Lugo – who stumbled during his delivery. It was a floating curveball that appeared to be both high and inside, but Ripperger called it strike one. Pillar yelled, “Come on!” and a series of f-bombs and GDs before continuing the at-bat. The next pitched missed outside for ball one. The third pitch was another curveball, but this one caught the top of the zone for strike two. Pillar fumed again, making it obvious that he was letting his anger at the first pitch distract him. After fouling the next pitch back, he ripped a curveball. It went straight to the third baseman, who threw to second for the inning-ending force play.

As Pillar trotted to the dugout, he gave Ripperger an earful. Ripperger chucked him, and Pillar almost blew his top. Two Giants – a coach and the on-deck hitter (Pablo Sandoval) – grabbed hold of Pillar and escorted him off the field.

Understand the frustration?

About the first pitch, yes, but Pillar needs to have more poise. He let it ruin the rest of the at-bat.

Was the ejection justified?

Yes. Pillar was out of line, and after the way he argued the first pitch, he’s lucky that he got to finish his at-bat. Had he kept his mouth shut while returning to the dugout, he would have stayed in the game.

Entertainment Rating

Two Weavers, receiving a bonus point when his teammates took him off the field.

 

Anthony Rizzo, Chicago Cubs First Baseman

When

Wednesday, July 24th, at San Francisco Giants, top of the fifth

Umpire

Jordan Baker (HP)

Description

With the Cubs leading, 4-1, in the top of the fifth, Rizzo batted with two out and the bases empty. He took a 3-1 pitch near the outside corner. Thinking it was a ball, he dropped his bat and headed toward first, only to hear Baker call it a strike. Rizzo argued quietly as he picked his bat up and dug back in. Two pitches later, Rizzo swung and missed. He yelled two f-bombs before tossing his bat toward the dugout. Baker threw him out.

Understand the frustration?

Sort of, but not to this extent. He complained about strike two, but he received two great pitches to hit afterward and took bad swings at them.

Was the ejection justified?

After the way Rizzo argued strike two, he was on thin ice. It was only a natural progression for Rizzo to go after yelling two f-bombs upon striking out. Therefore, yes, it was.

Entertainment Rating

One Weaver. This wasn’t memorable.

 

Kyle Freeland, Colorado Rockies Pitcher

When

Wednesday, July 24th, at Washington Nationals, top of the seventh

Umpire

John Libka (HP)

Description

The Nationals led, 2-1, in the top of the seventh of the second game of a twi-night doubleheader. With no one out and a runner on first, Rockies second baseman Garrett Hampson dropped a bunt, trying to sacrifice the runner to second. He misplaced the bunt. The pitcher fielded the ball in time to nab the lead runner at second.

Catcher Chris Iannetta took the subsequent pitch for a strike near the knees. The Rockies dugout, who had been upset with Libka’s zone for most of the game, barked protests. Pitcher Kyle Freeland, who started the game, said something Libka didn’t like, so Libka dumped him.

Understand the frustration?

Yes. It was a long day, the Rockies lost the first game, they were losing the second one, and from their vantage point in the dugout, the strike zone was inconsistent.

Was the ejection justified?

Without knowing what Freeland said, this is hard to say. However, if it weren’t, Black probably would have run onto the field to argue.

Entertainment Rating

Zero Weavers. The game hardly paused, let alone stopped.

 

Cody Bellinger, Los Angeles Dodgers Right Fielder

When

Wednesday, July 24th, vs. Los Angeles Angels, top of the ninth

Umpire

Dan Iassogna (HP)

Description

With the Angels leading 3-2, Cody Bellinger stepped to the plate with third baseman Justin Turner on first and nobody out in the bottom of the eighth. The first pitch from Cam Bedrosian missed low for ball one. Next, Bedrosian threw a tailing fastball that appeared to be outside, but Iassogna called it a strike. Bellinger yelled GD and pumped his fist in frustration. The next pitch was almost identical. Iassogna called it strike two, drawing the same reaction from Bellinger. Both times, manager Dave Roberts yelled from the dugout, “Keep him on the plate, Dan! Let’s go!” Bellinger then took a pitch that went straight down the middle for strike three.

Cody Bellinger Ejected

The next hitter, center fielder A.J. Pollock, grounded into a 6-4-3 double play. Bellinger held his fingers several inches apart and yelled, mixed with profanity, that it was “this far off the plate.” Iassogna threw him out. Roberts and Bellinger charged up to Iassogna and continued yelling about the zone for about half a minute before leaving the field.

Understand the frustration?

Yes. Those pitches should have been balls.

Was the ejection justified?

Yes. Bellinger had said his piece. Bringing it up again later called for an ejection.

Entertainment Rating

Two Weavers. The post-ejection rant was somewhat fun to watch, although it didn’t last long.

Leaderboard

After 17 weeks, here are the leaders. Fight-related ejections are not counted toward the leaderboard.

Managers: Tie between Cincinnati Reds manager Bell and Detroit Tigers manager Ron Gardenhire (seven each)
Players: Tigers designated hitter Miguel Cabrera (two)
Team high: Reds (13), Tigers (nine)
Team low: Cleveland Indians and Tampa Bay Rays (one each)
Umpire: Mike Estabrook (eight)

 

Look for Week 18 on Thursday, August 1st.

Evan Thompson played baseball as a youth and teenager. He also umpired between 1995 and 2004 and has coached at the high school level.

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