Ejection Inspection, Week 23: Rick Renteria of the Chicago White Sox Gets Tossed Twice

Rick Renteria
CHICAGO - AUGUST 13: Manager Rick Renteria #36 of the Chicago White Sox looks on against the Houston Astros during the first game of a doubleheader on August 13, 2019 at Guaranteed Rate Field in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Ron Vesely/MLB Photos via Getty Images)

Rick Renteria Gets Tossed Twice

Welcome to Week 23 of Ejection Inspection! The premise and ground rules are detailed here. The condensed version: each ejection from the previous week (Thursday through Wednesday) is listed in a table. The author – a former player/coach/umpire – analyzes each ejection and assigns it an entertainment rating of one to five Weavers in honor of late Baltimore Orioles manager Earl Weaver. This week, with two ejections, Chicago White Sox manager Rick Renteria moved into a three-way tie for first. Cincinnati Reds coach Turner Ward also extended his team’s lead for the season, picking up the 19th non-fight-related ejection of the season. Plus, umpire Mike Estabrook extended his lead with his 11th of the season.

(For a list of every article in this series, click here.)

There were 10 ejections in Week 23 – five players, four managers, and a hitting coach.

Ejection Table

Date Team Opp Inn. Name Pos Umpire Pos Reason
1 Thu 8/29 HOU TB B9 Josh Reddick RF Jordan Baker HP Arguing balls/strikes
2 Fri 8/30 CWS @ATL B7 Rick Renteria Mgr Brian Knight HP Arguing balls/strikes
3 Fri 8/30 TOR HOU B7 Vladimir Guerrero Jr. 3B Mike Estabrook HP Arguing balls/strikes
4 Sat 8/31 PHL NYM B3 Rhys Hoskins 1B Will Little HP Arguing balls/strikes
5 Sat 8/31 MIA @WSN T8 Lewis Brinson CF Nic Lentz HP Arguing balls/strikes
6 Sun 9/1 MIL @CHC T7 Yasmani Grandal C Tim Timmons HP Arguing balls/strikes
7 Sun 9/1 LAA BOS B9 Brad Ausmus Mgr David Rackley HP Arguing no balk call
8 Sun 9/1 CIN @STL T7 Turner Ward HtC Bill Miller HP Arguing balls/strikes
9 Mon 9/2 CWS @CLE B5 Rick Renteria Mgr Mark Carlson HP Arguing checked swing vs foul ball
10 Tue 9/3 BAL @TB T8 Brandon Hyde Mgr Lance Barrett HP Arguing checked swing

 

Josh Reddick, Houston Astros Right Fielder

When

Thursday, August 29th, vs. Tampa Bay Rays, bottom of the ninth

Umpire

Jordan Baker (HP)

Description

With one out, the bases empty, and the Astros down 9-8, Reddick took a 3-2 pitch halfway down his shins. Thinking he had drawn a walk, he tossed his bat and started toward first. Baker called strike three, and Reddick spun while yelling, “What the (expletive)?!? That’s (bleeping) terrible!” Reddick then removed his helmet as Baker pitched him but stopped short of slamming it down. As Reddick continued arguing, he flipped his hair out of his face with a head flick several times.

Understand the frustration?

Yes. Reddick was the game-tying run. He felt he had drawn ball four on a low pitch only to hear Baker ring him up.

Was the ejection justified?

Technically, yes, but it seemed quick for the game situation. The tying run had just struck out on a close 3-2 pitch in an exhausting four-hour game. It seemed to call for more patience.

Entertainment Rating

Three Weavers for the multiple hair flips.

 

Rick Renteria, Chicago White Sox Manager

When

Friday, August 30th, at Atlanta Braves, bottom of the seventh

Umpire

Brian Knight (HP)

Description

With runners on first and second, two out, and the Braves leading 6-5, Braves catcher Tyler Flowers took a 2-2 fastball from White Sox reliever Aaron Bummer. It narrowly missed inside but looked like it might have broken across the plate. Rick Renteria started yelling protests from the dugout, including “that was a great pitch” and some others that included more colorful metaphors. Bummer then missed low with another fastball, walking the bases loaded. As Renteria went to the mound to replace Bummer, he gave Knight an earful. Knight bounced him. Renteria finished the pitching change and then sorted things out with Knight during the warmup. Interestingly, the conversation was quite civil and seemed to end with them nodding in agreement. Renteria then headed to the clubhouse.

Understand the frustration?

Yes. It looked like Knight missed what would have been strike three and ended the inning.

Was the ejection justified?

Yes. Managers cannot argue balls and strikes. Doing so from a distance during a pitching change will get them tossed every time.

Entertainment Rating

Three Weavers because of how civil it was.

 

Vladimir Guerrero Jr. Toronto Blue Jays Third Baseman

When

Friday, August 30th, vs. Houston Astros, bottom of the seventh

Umpire

Mike Estabrook (HP)

Description

With a runner on first, one out, and the Astros ahead 6-2, Guerrero took a pitch near the knees and near the outside corner. Estabrook called a strike that Guerrero saw differently. Vladito snapped his head toward Estabrook in disbelief then stepped out of the box and walked himself calm – all without a word or gesture. He dug back in and whiffed a curveball away. After striking out, he pointed at Estabrook as if to say, “I swung at that because of your call.” (Microphones and cameras didn’t pick up what he said.) Estabrook held his hand up to tell him that was enough. Guerrero looked back over his shoulder without saying anything, and Estabrook dumped him.

Understand the frustration?

Sort of, but telling an umpire that you swung at a pitch because of him is a quick way to get on his bad side.

Was the ejection justified?

Technically, yes, but this extremely quick trigger made Estabrook look like a bully. After the warning, Guerrero didn’t say a word. He only looked at Estabrook. Furthermore, he made no argument whatsoever after getting run.

Entertainment Rating

Two Weavers because of the complete lack of a reaction from Guerrero after the ejection.

 

Rhys Hoskins, Philadelphia Phillies First Baseman

When

Saturday, August 31st, vs. New York Mets, bottom of the third

Umpire

Will Little (HP)

Description

This one was goofy. Hoskins came to bat in the bottom of the third with two out and Bryce Harper on first. Harper stole second on the first pitch, a strike right down the middle. Both TV stations marked the pitch as a ball, causing confusion for the viewers and announcers. The next pitch was a changeup over the middle that caught the lower end of the zone for strike two. Hoskins did not like the call and showed obvious displeasure. The third pitch appeared to be even with the navel. Hoskins thought it was high, but Little called strike three. Hoskins threw his bat in front of him, threw his helmet to the ground in front of him, and told Little, “That’s awful.” BOOM! See ya.

Understand the frustration?

Yes. He thought the pitch was high.

Was the ejection justified?

Yes. He acted like a toddler who didn’t get his way. Hoskins has been around long enough to know that telling an umpire “that’s awful” about a call is a trigger for many of them.

Entertainment Rating

One Weaver. This was more eye-rolling than entertaining.

 

Lewis Brinson, Miami Marlins Center Fielder

When

Saturday, August 31st, at Washington Nationals, top of the eighth

Umpire

Nic Lentz (HP)

Description

Brinson faced Stephen Strasburg with two out, nobody on, and a 6-0 deficit. He took the first pitch low and away then fouled two off, making the count 1-2. The fans rose and clapped, urging Strasburg toward strikeout number 14. He threw the next two in the dirt, making the count full, before Brinson fouled two more off. He then took a breaking ball at the top of the zone for strike three. Brinson disagreed, saying, “That was up,” and the umpire said no. Brinson then spiked his helmet and received his marching orders. En route to the dugout, he yelled, “You didn’t even give me a warning!” at least three times.

Understand the frustration?

Not really. He shouldn’t be taking those types of pitches. That was an example of a pitch that Yogi Berra was talking about when he once said that guys in the modern game were taking pitches that put him in the Hall of Fame.

Was the ejection justified?

Yes. He spiked his helmet in dispute of the call.

Entertainment Rating

One Weaver. This was nothing special.

 

Yasmani Grandal, Milwaukee Brewers Catcher

When

Sunday, September 1st, at Chicago Cubs, top of the seventh

Umpire

Tim Timmons (HP)

Description

Grandal led off the top of the seventh with the Cubs leading, 1-0. On 1-1, he took a pitch near the knees for strike two and didn’t like the call. He said something as the dugout howled. He then took one that was a tiny bit higher than the previous one but was still near the knees. Timmons rung him up. Grandal rolled his eyes, threw his arm up in disgust, and let the bat drop on home plate. BANG! Timmons gave him the heave-ho.

Brewers manager Craig Counsell charged onto the field to plead his catcher’s case. Wide-eyed, he told Timmons, “You can’t do that, Tim! You can’t do that! Not in a game like this! You can’t do that! (Pause) He put the bat down. You’re gonna throw him out? Come on, Tim! Are you kidding me? I’m not gonna calm down, Tim! (Two unclear sentences.) You can’t do that! That’s ridiculous!” He then said something starting with “bull” twice before heading back to the dugout.

Understand the frustration?

Striking out in a 1-0 game is always frustrating, so yes.

Was the ejection justified?

Absolutely. What Grandal did was a visually obvious dispute of Timmons’ call.

Entertainment Rating

Three Weavers. Counsell is always fun to watch when he gets charged up, but as a bonus, the expression on on-deck-hitter Christian Yelich’s face while he watched the argument from the background was great. He stood there like he was watching his science teacher give a lesson while the principal observed the class. To cap it all off, Yelich patted Counsell on the shoulder as he walked by.

 

Brad Ausmus, Los Angeles Angels Manager

When

Sunday, September 1st, vs. Boston Red Sox, bottom of the ninth

Umpire

David Rackley (HP)

Description

Angels left fielder Brian Goodwin fouled off an 0-2 pitch with two out and Mike Trout on first. Ausmus felt that Red Sox pitcher Brandon Workman was not stopping before pitching the baseball. If Workman wasn’t stopping, that’s a balk. Ausmus demanded it from the dugout and ended up being tossed. After the ejection, he came on the field to demand that the umpires make Workman stop. Then Ausmus left the game.

Understand the frustration?

Yes. Coaches always get frustrated when their opponent either doesn’t stop for very long or doesn’t stop at all.

Was the ejection justified?

Hard to say without knowing what Ausmus said.

Entertainment Rating

One Weaver. This almost went unnoticed.

 

Turner Ward, Cincinnati Reds Hitting Coach

When

Sunday, September 1st, at St. Louis Cardinals, top of the seventh

Umpire

Bill Miller (HP)

Description

The Reds were upset about the first pitch to left fielder Josh VanMeter, who led off the seventh with the Reds leading, 5-3. It looked to be a bit wide of the plate, but Miller called it a strike. VanMeter flied to left on the next pitch, bringing up second baseman Freddy Galvis. The first pitch to him clipped the lower outside corner of the zone for a strike. The second pitch came near the top corner for strike two. If it missed, it was inside and not by much.

Ward yelled at Miller from the dugout, saying, “Come on, at least call them over the plate!” Miller called time, looked to Ward, and said, “Are you yelling at me?” Ward (according to Fox Sports Ohio’s sideline reporter, who was standing right there) responded, “I sure am! Call the game! We gotta be standing out here just like you!” Miller then threw him out and said, “You’re done!” Manager David Bell came onto the field to protest the decision. He talked to Miller for about a minute before returning to the dugout.

Understand the frustration?

Yes, although none of those pitches were egregious.

Was the ejection justified?

Yes. Ward argued balls and strikes, for one, but secondly, Ward is an assistant coach. Umpires will give managers some leeway with arguments, but not with assistants. Also, when Miller asked, “Are you yelling at me?” Ward had an escape. Instead of using it, he went further.

Entertainment Rating

One Weaver. This was dumb.

 

Rick Renteria, Chicago White Sox Manager

When

Monday, September 2nd, at Cleveland Indians, bottom of the fifth

Umpire

Mark Carlson (HP)

Description

On a 2-2 count, Indians shortstop Francisco Lindor fouled a low pitch. The catcher shorthopped the ball, so it was a foul ball and not a strike. Rick Renteria barked protest from the dugout, claiming that the catcher caught the ball. Carlson told him the ball hit the ground. Renteria said, “That’s (bleeping) terrible.” Then he started repeatedly waving his hand toward Carlson as he said, “Terrible!” over and over.

Carlson booted him, but Renteria sat there, telling Carlson to come over there and throw him out. He obliged, then Renteria told him a few more things before leaving the dugout.

Understand the frustration?

Renteria was irritated about a few calls earlier, and even though this one was correct, he felt it wasn’t. That added fuel to the fire.

Was the ejection justified?

Yes, and Renteria knew it. When he started repeating, “Terrible!” in a constant loop, it felt like he was trying to get chucked.

Entertainment Rating

One Weaver. Nothing special. It’s like Renteria reads this column, because he’s starting to only say things in a way that the camera can’t pick up his lip movements. He’s also saying more things that are out of range of the microphones.

 

Brandon Hyde, Baltimore Orioles Manager

When

Tuesday, September 3rd, at Tampa Bay Rays, top of the eighth

Umpire

Lance Barrett (HP)

Description

Orioles pinch hitter Trey Mancini tried to check his swing while chasing a 2-2 curveball in the dirt. On appeal, first base umpire Nic Lentz ruled that Mancini went around, ending the inning on a strikeout. Mancini screamed at Lentz, who turned his back. Barrett then told Mancini to let it go and return to the dugout, and Mancini complied.

Hyde came out of the dugout and let Barrett have it. He also went nuts on both Lentz and second base umpire Mike Everitt. During the argument, he kicked dirt over home plate while yelling. His rant lasted several seconds. It involved lots of pointing and words that start with “horse.”

Understand the frustration?

He was more frustrated with a call in the top of the third. Shortstop Richie Martin laid down a sacrifice bunt with first baseman Chris Davis on second. The throw went wide, but Martin was running inside of the foul line, drawing an interference call when he impeded Sogard’s ability to make the catch. The throw sailed wide, Davis scored, and Martin ended up on third. Baltimore thought it had a 1-0 lead, only to have Martin be called out as Davis returned to second. (Davis never scored due to bad baserunning.)

When the check swing happened, Hyde was yelling about both the checked swing and this call. Both combined for an explosive situation.

Was the ejection justified?

Yes, and Hyde seemed to be trying for an ejection.

Entertainment Rating

Four Weavers. Earl would have been proud of this one. Yelling…pointing…kicking dirt…lengthy…it was vintage Earl Weaver.

 

 

Leaderboard

After 23 weeks, here are the leaders. Fight-related ejections do not count toward the leaderboard.

Managers: Renteria, Bell, and Ron Gardenhire of the Detroit Tigers (eight each)
Players: Tigers designated hitter Miguel Cabrera (three)
Team high: Reds (19, 23 if you count the fight), Tigers (11)
Team low: Cleveland Indians (one)
Umpire: Mike Estabrook (11)

 

Look for Week 24 on Thursday, September 12th.

Evan Thompson played baseball as a youth and teenager. He also umpired between 1995 and 2004 and has coached at the high school level.

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